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Posts tagged “Greg Glassman

Shoulder Press, Push Press, Push Jerk

crossfit

Jason Khalipa Talks about the Shoulder Press, Push Press, and Push Jerk

CrossFit Journal Preview (http://journal.crossfit.com).

You can push jerk more than you can push press, and you can push press more than you can shoulder press. No secret there.

But did you know that most can push press roughly 30 percent more than they can shoulder press and push jerk roughly 30 percent more than they can push press? So says CrossFit Founder and CEO Greg Glassman.

Although not an obvious core-to-extremity movement, the shoulder press requires midline stabilization, says HQ trainer Matt Chan.

“You’re using your body … as a brace, basically,” he explains. “And basically you’re trying to resist hyperextension of the lower back as you press.”

The push press, meanwhile, allows for a quicker cycle time of the same weight, says HQ trainer Pat Sherwood. And the movement feels more metabolic.

Finally, the push jerk is “the weightlifting equivalent of slappin’ somebody in the face,” says HQ trainer Adrian “Boz” Bozman. “It’s a big wind-up and, bam—you’re done. It doesn’t happen slowly. It hits you pretty hard.”

crossfit


CrossFit – Nutrition: An Interview with Fast Company Magazine and Greg Glassman

CrossFit Journal Preview.

http://journal.crossfit.com/2011/10/greggamesnutrition.tpl#featureArticleTitle


Squat Clinic By Greg Glassman

Why squat? The squat is a vital, natural, and functional component of your being. In the bottom position, the squat is nature’s intended sitting posture. Only in the industrialized world do we find the need for chairs, couches, benches, and stools. This comes at a loss of functionality that contributes immensely to decrepitude.

On the athletic front, the squat is the quintessential hip extension exercise, and hip extension is the foundation of all good human movement. Powerful, controlled hip extension is necessary and nearly sufficient for elite athleticism. “Necessary” in that without powerful, controlled hip extension you are not functioning anywhere near your potential. “Sufficient” in the sense that everyone we’ve met with the capacity to explosively open the hip could also run, jump, throw, and punch with impressive force. Secondarily, but no less important, the squat is among those exercises eliciting a potent neuroendocrine response. This benefit is ample reason for an exercise’s inclusion in your regimen.

Weak glutes and hamstrings are among the causes of bad squats. So are poor engagement, weak control, or lack of awareness of the glutes and hamstrings.

Useful therapies for weak, underdeveloped and/or poorly executed squats are outlined as well. Box squats, squat therapy and the use of external objects (for spatial orientation) are helpful tools to get deconditioned and/or misinformed athletes squatting correctly.

The Squat Clinic, by Coach Greg Glassman, is a comprehensive guide to our most foundational movement. Photographs outline 23 points of performance for a sound squat, common faults and cues to correct them.

http://journal.crossfit.com/2002/12/squat-clinic-by-greg-glassman.tpl#featureArticleTitle

Squat Clinic By Greg Glassman.