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Judo

Video

Takedown Tuesdays: 101 Judo Ippons Nage-waza 2009-2010 Full HD

101 Judo Ippons Nage-waza 2009-2010 Full HD


Video

Judo Grand Prix Jeju 2013: Day 2

Judo Grand Prix Jeju 2013
Location: Jeju (KOR)
Date: 5-6 Dec 2013


Video

Increasing Flexibility & Mobility w/ Soft Tissue Release

One of the things we are asked about most frequently is how to improve flexibility and mobility. One of the cheapest and biggest bang-for-your-buck tips we have is to use a lacrosse ball or something similar to do some soft tissue release in some of the commonly tight areas around your big joints. These areas include your hips and your shoulders, particularly the psoas (hip flexors), the pectorals (especially the pec minor), and the latissimus dorsi (lats). These areas are typically very tight from sitting and from favoring particular movements like the bench press, so releasing the tight fascia in these parts can help to improve your flexibility, range-of-motion, and joint mobility.


Video

Do you feel the pressure before competing?

In this video Gustavo Dantas talks about how about to release the pre-jiu-jitsu competition pressure regardless of the size of the tournament. For more info about Gustavo Dantas, visit http://www.gdjiujitsu.com or call GD Jiu-Jitsu Academy in Tempe, Arizona at 480-968-6303. 30 Day free trial.


Video

101 Judo Ippons Nage-waza 2009-2010 [Full HD]

101 Judo Ippons Nage-waza 2009-2010 [Full HD]


UFC 157: Rousey vs Carmouche Extended Preview

The UFC women’s bantamweight title will be on the line for the first time at UFC 157, as Ronda Rousey faces Liz Carmouche. Plus, Lyoto Machida and Dan Henderson face off with a chance to move closer to the UFC light heavyweight crown.


Pull and Grip Strength Progression – Carl Paoli


Richard Lansky – Improving Athletic Performance and Power

Richard Lansky – Improving Athletic Performance and Power


Paleo Diet & Strength Training Biochemistry | Doug McGuff M.D. |

About : Doug McGuff, MD became interested in exercise at the age of 15 when he first read Arthur Jones’ Nautilus Training Bulletin No. 2. His interest in exercise and biology led him into a career in medicine. In 1989, he graduated from the University of Texas Medical School at San Antonio and went on to train in Emergency Medicine at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences at Little Rock where he served as Chief Resident. From there, Dr. McGuff served as Faculty in the Wright State University Emergency Medicine Residency and was a staff Emergency Physician at Wright-Patterson AFB Hospital.

Throughout his career Dr. McGuff maintained his interest in high intensity exercise. Doug realized a lifelong dream when he opened Ultimate Exercise in November, 1997. Over the past 13 years Dr. McGuff and his instructors have continued to explore the limits of exercise through their personal training clients at Ultimate Exercise.

In addition to his work at Ultimate Exercise, Dr. McGuff is a partner with Blue Ridge Emergency Physicians, P.A. Dr. McGuff Lives in Seneca, South Carolina with his wife of 25-years, and their Children Eric and Madeline.

Doug is the best selling co-author of Body by Science ( http://amzn.to/eBSQif) and The Body by Science Question and Answer Book (http://amzn.to/bUajU5 ).

Visit Doug’s blog at http://www.bodybyscience.net

See Doug’s second lecture at The 21 Convention here :https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8j8qDwR56DA


JUDO World Championship – Tokyo 2010

JUDO World Championship – Tokyo 2010


CrossFit – “The Foundation Is Nutrition”

Combining the CrossFit training methodology with a diet of meat and vegetables, nuts and seeds, some fruit, little starch and no sugar brings “a jet stream of adaptation,” says CrossFit founder Greg Glassman.

In the pyramid Glassman created, nutrition is the foundation, with met-cons, gymnastics, weightlifting and throwing, and sport following.

“Each level builds on the level below it,” explains Nicole Carroll, director of certification. “If your nutrition sucks, these things will not be where they could be if it were more solid.”

Likewise, Glassman says CrossFit favors Barry Sears’ Zone Diet “because it does give me accurate and precise prescription for caloric intake and, more importantly, the exact levels of macronutrient that I can start at.”

Likewise, trainers and coaches can make informed decisions on how to tweak an athlete’s diet for improved performance, he says.

CrossFit HQ trainer Pat Sherwood says nutrition isn’t an either/or aspect of training.

“It’s not quality or quantity. It can and it should be both.”


Why winners keep winning

winningWhether the game involves competing every four years in the Olympics or every day in a business, winning brings advantages that make it easier to keep winning.

To understand sustainable success, I compared perpetual winners with long-term losers in professional and amateur sports and then matched the findings to business case studies for my book Confidence. The sports were a comprehensive mix including women’s soccer, men’s and women’s college basketball, major league baseball, U.S. football, international cricket, and North American ice hockey.

I found that winners gain ten important advantages as a result of victory — and that smart leaders can cultivate and build on these advantages to make the next success possible.

1. Good mood. Clearly everyone feels good about winning, while emotions sag at failure. Emotions affect performance. Positive moods produce physical energy and the resilience to persist after setbacks. While losers use any excuse to stop, winners sometimes play on even while injured, lifted by a kind of winners’ high. Moreover, psychologists find that moods are contagious. Winners’ exhilaration is infectious. Losers’ gloom can be toxic.

2. Attractive situation. Whether at children’s soccer games or in the office, losers go home early. Winners stick around. My studies show that there is less absenteeism or tardiness in organizations known for their successes. There is also more solidarity, because people spend more time together feeling good about what they can accomplish. More time together brings more chances for information-sharing and mentoring.

3. Learning. Losers get defensive and don’t want to hear about their many failings, so they avoid feedback. Winners are more likely to voluntarily discuss mistakes and accept negative feedback, because they are comfortable that they can win. Because they are confident about the possibility of winning, they see practicing as a route to a positive outcome, not as a punishment. For athletes, practice matters. Winning is often found in mastery of the details. As a former student found in studies of swimmers who did and didn’t qualify for the Olympics, excellence consists of examining and improving many small processes and routines.

4. Freedom to focus. As every golfer and tennis player knows, you must keep your eye on the ball. Losers often punish themselves in their heads. Winners have fewer distractions. Golf pro Tiger Woods won nearly every championship until hit with personal problems of his own making, which was followed by loses on the golf course.

5. Positive culture of mutual respect. For anyone who plays on a team, winning makes it easier to respect and listen to one another, because after all, if you win together, then the presumption is that everyone is a good player. Winners can maintain high aspirations and act generously toward others. Losers are more likely to blame others and disdain them as mediocre, creating a culture of finger-pointing and infighting.

6. Solid support system. Behind every high performance athlete or team is a cadre of coaches, friends, and fans that fuel motivation. Winning enlarges the circle of backers. Losing erodes support. For instance, the cheerleaders for one perpetually losing college football team used to leave the stadium at half-time. When even their cheerleaders feel they won’t win, how can athletes gear up for the next try?

7. Better press. It’s not just the buzz at time of victory that separates winners from losers, it’s also the more favorable story about the past and future. Winning provides a halo that makes everything seem to glow. Losing causes observers and analysts to probe for reasons in a rewritten version of the past that makes continuing losses seem inevitable.

8. Invitations to the best parties. Really. Winners get invited to the White House, Buckingham Palace, key conferences or exhibitions. They gain access to networks and relationships that confer benefits that maintain winners’ momentum, such as early information or better deals. Who invites the losers?

9. Self-determination. Winners have more control over their own destiny. “Why tamper with success?” we often say. Winners are left alone, getting a free pass on reviews (occasionally tragically, as at Penn State, where locker room abuse went uninvestigated). Losers get attention of the negative kind. They are encumbered with “help” — special committees, audits, reviews, frequent visitors. Enough of that, and losers spend their time in meetings instead of practicing and improving performance.

10. Continuity. Lose too often, and heads roll. New coaches, new strategies — like HP’s lurching between hardware and software or Yahoo’s parade of exiting CEOs. High turnover consumes time and attention. More time spent getting people on board leaves little time to fully execute any particular game plan. It’s hard to start winning again until the situation stabilizes. Winners have the luxury implementing long-term strategies and planning for orderly succession.

Winning streaks eventually end because winners can get over-confident, slipping into arrogance or complacency, or because the competition gets better. But leaders can build on the advantages of winners to encourage a positive spirit, disciplined focus, mutual respect, lots of practice on the details, and lasting support systems that can make successes and comebacks more likely.


USA Men’s Judo Training

U.S. Olympic judo teammates Travis Stevens and Kyle Vashkulat talk about their experiences at previous Olympic Games, their expectations for London and the influences that other teammates have on them.


ILIAS ILIADIS – TRAINING MONTAGE

Featuring Double World & Olympic Champion Ilias Iliadis of Greece.

Ilias Iliadis training in the mountains of Georgia one month before he takes to the tatami for the 2012 London Olympic Games.

Iliadis is captain of Fighting Films’ Team Superstar. Features of the Fighting Films Superstar Gi include a tighter fit, poly-cotton material, no shrinkage, soft interior and a tighter cut on the shoulders. The most competitive of all IJF approved gis!


Judo introductie – Mark Huizinga – Uitleg & Technieken

Judo introductie – Mark Huizinga – Uitleg & Technieken


Mifune – The Essence of Judo

http://youtu.be/46veLgINFjU

50 years old and awesome. His unthrowability at 56minutes may be some of the most important footage for judo and aikidoists


UFC 146: WATCH THE REPLAY

UFC

UFC 146: WATCH THE REPLAY


Na pegada do MMA

Nova Uniao

Gravação da música feita pelo Gabriel Moura, para o nosso documentário “Lutando para Vencer”, sobre o crescimento do MMA no Brasil, com o mestre André Pederneiras, em breve video clip.

Direção : Leandro Lima
Fotografia : Pablo Hoffmann
Câmera: Gabriel Hoffmann
Som direto: Evandro Lima
Assistente de som : Mãoli

Nova Uniao

 

 

 

 

 

 

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101 JUDO IPPONS 2011

The very best Judo Ippons from 2011 are gathered on this, the incredible latest instalment of 101 Ippons! Once again every type of Ippon is featured in separate sections of strangulations, armlocks, hold-downs and dramatic throws.

Footage comes from 13 of the best judo tournaments of 2011, including the historic Paris World Championships, The World Masters, three Grand Slams and multiple Grand Prix and World Cups. All the best fighters in World Judo are featured, including Uzbekistan’s Sobirov, Korea’s Wang, the awesome Dutchman Grol and Brazil’s master of style Camilo.


Judo Grip Fighting and Gripping Drills and Skills

For the best grip fighting information for Judo and for Brazilian Jiujitsu you should most definitely get your hands on Underground Gripfighting Secrets 2.0. World Judo Champion, Jimmy Pedro and Dr. Rhadi Ferguson provide the best judo grip fighting instruction in this educational series on gripping and grip fighting that meets the mark on quality judo and grip fighting information and then surpasses it.


Anderson Silva and Lyoto Machida Sparring at Black House

Anderson Silva and Lyoto Machida Sparring at Black House

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ILIAS ILIADIS – The Superstar

 


Takedowns for BJJ – Yoko Tomoe Nage – Joel Gerson

National level Judoka and MMA veteran Joel Gerson demonstrates a throw that is both beautiful and useful when going against a stiff armed opponent in a BJJ match. Usually in Judo, practitioners are penalized for being too stiff armed because it is stalling and it is too defensive. This “yoko tomoe nage” is a nifty solution of the situation.

For more great BJJ videos subscribe to our youtube channel at JitsTV.com.


Takedowns for BJJ – Yoko Tomoe Nage – Joel Gerson Part 1 – Jits Magazine

National level Judoka and MMA veteran Joel Gerson demonstrates a throw that is both beautiful and useful when going against a stiff armed opponent in a BJJ match. Usually in Judo, practitioners are penalized for being too stiff armed because it is stalling and it is too defensive. This “yoko tomoe nage” is a nifty solution of the situation.

For more great BJJ videos subscribe to our youtube channel at JitsTV.com.